Blondie For Victory (1942)

Blondie’s Blessed Event, released in 1942 as the 11th film in the Blondie series, was the first to make passing reference to America’s then recent involvement in World War II. The end of the film, like so many others in the series, finds Dagwood fired from the J.C. Dithers Construction Company. A representative of the government arrives to offer Dagwood a job researching alternative building materials, so that “every scrap of iron and steel can be used for victory.” The following film would be about only this topic.

Blondie For Victory opens with Dagwood’s boss getting flustered by a call from his wife informing him that nine soldiers are being barracked at his house. Dagwood goes home to find his house the location of a meeting of the Housewives of America, an organization Blondie is organizing for “the defense and preservation of the American home.” It is unclear what they actually do other than make their husbands terrified that they might do something that might make them appear unpatriotic. Blondie and the other housewives plunge into volunteer work for the group, leaving the boys to fend for themselves, with the expected frictions within home life. Meanwhile son Alexander and neighbor boy Alvin Fuddle collect donations for the war effort. While this gives an interesting peak at attitudes towards the war effort in the early stages of the war, it is not especially a good comedy, and there are no stand-out funny moments.

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Random Quote

“Sometimes, I mean you know, knowing everything about someone, it seems nice, but really, maybe it's better to hold stuff back.”
-George Lonegan (Matt Damon)
from Hereafter