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Gothic & Lolita Psycho (2010)

Gothic & Lolita Psycho is a film that I had to see on a work assignment, as I did a write up on the influences of Gothic Lolita fashion in the movie, and did a short interview with the director for the online magazine TokyoFashion.com. It is not something I would have probably seen otherwise, but I am glad that I did. While I am not a fan of action and fight sequences for their own sake, the sheer ridiculousness of this film was instantly infectious, and I loved every minute of it.

The film opens with an extreme close-up of the mouth of a yakuza thug who is stuffing his face with spaghetti, dragging on a cigarette with his mouth full, and working the door at a demented nightclub where the patrons engage in sadistic, and extremely dangerous games for their own amusement. The title character shows up, decked out head to toe in cute Gothic garb, her cute look belying the fact that she is carrying a parasol fitted with a razor-sharp bayonet. She promptly dispatches the doorman, who stumbles in to the club spilling pasta out of his slashed stomach.  After a brutal (but funny) killing in the first few minutes, the film does not let up its pace for the next hour and a half. There is a bit of a back story which outlines that the title character was just a normal, conservatively dress girl until a band of demonic criminals, dressed what appear to be black garbage bags, burst into her birthday party, slay her mother and cripple her father. For reasons that are never really explained, she gives herself a drastic style makeover, and sets about exacting revenge on the killers one at a time. She flies around high school gymnasium while practicing martial arts on a flying teacher, engages in an epic battle with a school girl assassin who keeps pausing to answer her mobile phone and the story ends up with her using one hand to fight the supernatural leader of the gang while her other hand holds the rope attached to a guillotine in which her Christian priest father is trapped. Brilliant.

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Random Quote

“I hate you! I hate you! I hate you! No I didn't mean that, I love you. I hate you!”
-Carol Harbin (Diane Baker)
from Strait-Jacket