© 1952 Warner Bros. Pictures

This Woman Is Dangerous (1952)

Director: Felix E. Feist
Starring: Joan Crawford
Dennis Morgan
David Brian
Cinematographer: Ted D. McCord
Costume design: Sheila O'Brien
Year: 1952

In 1973, the publicist John Springer organized a series of talks at New York’s Town Hall called “Legendary Ladies,” honoring Bette Davis, Myrna Loy, Rosalind Russell, and others. In Joan Crawford’s appearance, the retired actress said that the only film she regretted making was This Woman Is Dangerous, and she said this with the shlockfest Trog (1970) was still a recent memory. Although This Woman Is Dangerous has a fantastic title, it is lacking in almost every other area. The plot is basically the same as the earlier Crawford film A Woman’s Face (1941), as she again plays a jaded woman who is involved with a band of criminals who tries to turn her life around after she meets a sympathetic doctor who cures her of her condition (a disfigured face in the earlier movie, the threat of blindness in this film). Although the doctors offer the possibility of a new and pure life, the men who represent her wicked past return. The difference between these two movies is that A Woman’s Face was directed by George Cukor, who crafted an excellent thriller, even though that was not his main genre, and the film also had an excellent cast besides Crawford. This Woman is Dangerous is a plodding B picture with a bunch of no name actors in supporting roles. Even so, Crawford is able to unleash her acid tongue now and then, making for a few nice moments.

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